Google Translate

Translate

Google Search

Search
School Logo

We focus on learning with reading at the heart of everything we do

Our Curriculum and how it prevents bullying.

Curriculum

The new Relationships and Sex Education (RSE) and Health Education curriculum will be compulsory from September 2020. The Department for Education has said that schools should start teaching from that date if they meet the statutory requirements. If they are not ready, or are unable to meet the requirements, they should begin teaching by at least the start of the summer term 2021. This page outlines the requirements relating to bullying

 

 

 

 

Relationships Education - Primary 

 

The guidance sets out categories under Relationships Education and states what pupils should know by the end of primary school. We have outlined below the elements of each that are pertinent to bullying and online bullying: 

 

Caring friendships

 

  • how important friendships are in making us feel happy and secure, and how people choose and make friends.
  • the characteristics of friendships, including mutual respect, truthfulness, trustworthiness, loyalty, kindness, generosity, trust, sharing interests and experiences and support with problems and difficulties.
  • that healthy friendships are positive and welcoming towards others, and do not make others feel lonely or excluded.
  • that most friendships have ups and downs, and that these can often be worked through so that the friendship is repaired or even strengthened, and that resorting to violence is never right.
  • how to recognise who to trust and who not to trust, how to judge when a friendship is making them feel unhappy or uncomfortable, managing conflict, how to manage these situations and how to seek help or advice from others, if needed.

 

Respectful relationships 

 

  • the importance of respecting others, even when they are very different from them (for example, physically, in character, personality or backgrounds), or make different choices or have different preferences or beliefs.
  • practical steps they can take in a range of different contexts to improve or support respectful relationships
  • about different types of bullying (including cyberbullying), the impact of bullying, responsibilities of bystanders (primarily reporting bullying to an adult) and how to get help.
  • what a stereotype is, and how stereotypes can be unfair, negative or destructive.
  • the importance of permission-seeking and giving in relationships with friends, peers and adults.

 

Online safety

 

  • that people sometimes behave differently online, including by pretending to be someone they are not.
  • that the same principles apply to online relationships as to face-toface relationships, including the importance of respect for others online including when we are anonymous.
  • the rules and principles for keeping safe online, how to recognise risks, harmful content and contact, and how to report them.
  • how to critically consider their online friendships and sources of information including awareness of the risks associated with people they have never met.

 

Health Education 

 

Under Health Education it also states that by the end of primary education: 

 

  • isolation and loneliness can affect children and that it is very important for children to discuss their feelings with an adult and seek support.
  • that bullying (including cyberbullying) has a negative and often lasting impact on mental wellbeing.
  • where and how to seek support (including recognising the triggers for seeking support), including whom in school they should speak to if they are worried about their own or someone else’s mental wellbeing or ability to control their emotions (including issues arising online).
Calendar

Calendar

Read more
Latest News
Top